Political Strategy

We expand the realm of the politically possible, creating and executing strategies that turn good ideas into reality

Creating Consensus on Climate and Forests

Since we opened our doors in 2008, Climate Advisers has been deeply engaged in efforts to promote U.S. leadership at the intersection of climate and forests.

In 2009, we created and staffed a bipartisan, high-level U.S. Commission on Climate and Tropical Forests, in partnership with the Meridian Institute. The Commission included prominent leaders from politics, business and the NGO community, including former U.S. Senators and cabinet officers, ambassadors, senior White House Officials, Fortune 100 CEOs and think tank founders, among others.

We also facilitated a multi-stakeholder agreement among NGOs and corporations that led to the formation of the Tropical Forest and Climate Coalition.

Together these efforts helped secure the U.S. commitment of $1 billion to reducing emissions from deforestation.

Advising the Senate on Global Climate Talks

Politics should stop at the water’s edge, but on climate change that is rarely the case. Yet U.S. and global interests are best served when the United States negotiates internationally from a position of strength, with the President and Congress aligned around a common foreign policy.

When President Obama took office, there was a real risk that U.S. efforts to negotiate on climate abroad would be undermined by domestic partisan – and intra-party – disagreements. There was a precedent: in 1997, President Clinton endorsed the Kyoto Protocol despite the Senate’s warnings not to do so. A resulting Sense of the Senate resolution was seen as a setback to U.S. climate leadership.

But times change. In 2009, with the Senate actively considering an ambitious climate bill approved by House of Representatives, sixteen moderate Senators sought assurances that a new international climate agreement would require action from all major emitters, including China and India. Wanting to get up to speed quickly, this group of Senators asked Climate Advisers to organize weekly briefings on key issues in global climate talks. Based on these sessions, these Senators came to the conclusion that the approach taken by President Obama made sense and avoided the pitfalls of the past.  Absent this engagement from Climate Advisers, the Senate might easily have rejected the emerging global climate agreement before it was finalized.

Advising the World’s Leading Climate Institutions

Climate Advisers plays an active, ongoing role in helping the world’s most influential climate leaders develop and implement climate strategies. Our partners include national governments, international organizations, major philanthropies, think tanks and NGO advocates. These institutions turn to Climate Advisers to help make sense of evolving political and policy conditions in Washington, DC and around the world, as well as for creative political strategies, innovative policy solutions and transformative data analysis.

Recently, Climate Advisers has partnered with the governments of the United States, Japan, Norway and Denmark, as well as the World Bank, the World Economic Forum and the UN Secretary-General to elevate new policy ideas and promote international climate cooperation.

We have advised the boards and leadership of the David & Lucile Packard Foundation, ClimateWorks Foundation, Energy Foundation, the Ford Foundation, William & Flora Hewlett Foundation, the Gordon & Better Moore Foundation, the United Nations Foundation and the German Marshall Fund of the United States.

We have strategic relationships with many of the world’s leading climate think tanks, including The Brookings Institution, Center for American Progress, Center for Global Development and Resources for the Future – and we frequently organize joint events and publish cobranded reports. And we have prepared original political and policy analysis for the world’s most recognized environment and development advocates, including World Wildlife Fund, Natural Resources Defense Council, Oxfam and Union of Concerned Scientists.